1955 Penny Value (Rare Errors, No Mint Mark, Price)

The value of a 1955 penny is determined by various criteria, including its date, mint mark, condition, and any unique characteristics it may contain. Let us break it down:

Date and Mint Mark Variety

In 1955, three mints made pennies:

Philadelphia Mint (No Mintmark): Produced the most coins, resulting in widespread availability. These are worth approximately $0.02 in good condition.

Denver Mint (“D” Mintmark): Also prolific, with over 563 million coins produced. Collectors look for above-average quality samples, which may be for up to $0.67.

San Francisco Mint (“S” Mintmark): The final year of coining operations in San Francisco. These coins were swiftly pulled from circulation due to their anticipated scarcity as collectibles. The value varies greatly:

  • 1955 DLB DIE: A rare variant worth between $1,317 and $2,313.
  • 1955 D: Is worth between $0.02 to $0.67.
  • 1955 S: Valued from $0.03 to $0.77.

Condition

The better the condition, the higher the value. Lightly worn 1955 pennies are more desirable to collectors.

Special Qualities

  • Certain components add or subtract from value. Eye appeal is important, therefore uneven coloration (bright and dark parts) might influence the coin’s value.
  • There’s also an uncommon variation known as the 1955 Doubled Die (DDO) penny. Its worth is dependent on condition and color:
Mint State Price
MS 62 $2,450 to $2,940
MS 63 $2,800 to $3,360
MS 64 $3,600 to $4,320
MS 65$7,500 to $8,500

1955 Wheat Penny

The 1955 Wheat Penny is an intriguing piece of numismatic history. Let’s look at its value, characteristics, and some interesting aspects:

Value

  • If you have a 1955 Philadelphia Wheat cent (marked red) graded MS60, it is worth approximately $3.
  • At MS63, its worth rises to around $9.
  • A well-preserved MS65 specimen is worth about $25.
  • The highest grade given to a 1955 no mint mark Wheat penny is MS67.

History and Design

  • The 1955 Wheat cent is part of the Lincoln penny series, first produced in 1909.
  • The obverse of these coins has Abraham Lincoln’s picture.
  • It marked the first time a real person appeared on US coinage, replacing the traditional picture of Lady Liberty.
  • The reverse design has two ears of durum wheat that curve down the coin’s edges.
  • Interestingly, only four years after the 1955 pennies were minted, the reverse design was modified in 1959 to display the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Obverse Portrait

  • The 1955 Wheat penny’s obverse depicts Abraham Lincoln’s right-facing profile.
  • These coins have slightly higher relief than current cents.
  • The portrait was painted by artist Victor David Brenner, who moved from Russia and ultimately became well-known for his work.
  • Initially, Wheat coins did not contain Brenner’s signature because the planned letters on the reverse were too prominent.

What is the 1955 Doubled Die Penny?

The 1955 Doubled Die penny is a noteworthy coin variant that appeared during the United States Mint’s manufacturing of one-cent coins in 1955. Here are some noteworthy details:

Origins

  • When making a modern coin die, it is struck from a working hub, which transmits the incuse picture to the die used to strike coins.
  • In 1955, one of the Philadelphia Mint’s working obverse dies became misaligned during the second blow from the operating hub. This resulted in a double image.
  • The date and inscriptions were significantly damaged by the doubling, whereas Abraham Lincoln’s bust saw modest doubling (but with noticeable loss of detail).
  • All coins produced with this die had these dual features.
  • Approximately 40,000 of these coins were produced during a single night shift at the Philadelphia Mint.

Circulation and Rarity

  • Following the minting mishap, around 20,000 to 24,000 of these pennies entered circulation.
  • The 1955 doubled die cent is one of the most recognizable die types in US currency.
  • Few survive now in completely mint condition, as the majority were discovered while in circulation.
  • Many counterfeits of this piece have surfaced throughout the years, therefore collectors should consult with experts before purchasing uncertified specimens.

Comparison to “Poor Man’s Doubled Die”

  • A seemingly similar type is the 1955 “Poor Man’s Doubled Die” cent, which was produced by die degradation doubling.
  • Die degradation doubling happens when a worn die erodes and distorts, causing portions of the design (such as the date’s final number) to look doubled.
  • The “Poor Man’s Doubled Die” is far more prevalent than the true doubled die and costs only a few dollars.

The 1955 doubled die penny is featured in the American movie UHF, where a beggar saves a local TV station by trading it for money. Although Denver mint produced some doubled die pennies in 1955, they are less noticeable than the famous Pennsylvania variety. The coin is also mentioned in Stephen King’s novella “A Good Marriage.”

1955 Wheat Penny No Mint Mark

The 1955 Wheat penny is a fascinating historical numismatic piece, known for its value, features, and intriguing aspects.

Mint Mark Variety

The 1955 Wheat penny, minted in Denver, will have a mint mark on the obverse, a small “D” beneath the date. If there is no letter, it was minted in Philadelphia, the first Mint facility, so it didn’t require a mark.

Value

The 1955 Wheat penny’s value depends on its condition and color, as they are not highly collectible in circulated condition, hence their perfection level is the main consideration.

Condition1955 No Mint Mark Penny1955 DDO No Mint Mark Penny1955 D Penny1955 S Penny
AU$0.17$2,489$0.17$0.45
Mint state 60$0.39$4,261$0.39$0.96
Mint state 63$1.13$17,057$1.13$3.30
Proof 63$20

The most costly cent made in Philadelphia in 1955 was sold for $8,625 at an auction in 2006.

Proof Coins

1955 proof coins come in various prices, with pennies worth $6 and $1,500 valued at $1,500 having hardly visible details, making it up to the collector to choose the desired coin.

Condition1955 BN Penny1955 RB Penny1955 RD Penny1955 RD CAM Penny1955 RD DCAM Penny
PR 65$6 to $7.20$9 to $10.80$10 to $12$25 to $30$185 to $212.75
PR 66$10 to $12$15 to $18$20 to $24$40 to $50$300 to $345
PR 67$25 to $30$30 to $36$45 to $55$85 to $102$375 to $431.25
PR 68$20$80 to $96$375 to $450$5,500 to $6,325

The most expensive proof is the one with deep cameo contrast, which was sold at an auction in 20032 for $14,950.

Denver Mint

In 1955, the Denver Mint produced more than 563 million Lincoln wheat pennies. The high mintage accounts for their low price, however each specimen in mint condition is worth more than its face value.

Condition1955 D BN Penny1955 D RB Penny1955 D RD Penny
MS 63$0.25 to $0.32$0.35 to $0.42$0.55 to $0.66
MS 64$0.40 to $0.48$0.50 to $0.60$1.25 to $1.50

1955 One Cent Penny

The 1955 Lincoln Wheat penny, commonly known as the 1955 one-cent penny, has both historical and potential worth. Let’s look at its worth and features:

Mint Mark Varieties

In 1955, three mints made pennies:

Philadelphia Mint (No Mintmark): Produced the most coins, resulting in widespread availability. These are worth approximately $0.02 in good condition.

Denver Mint (“D” Mintmark): Also prolific, with over 563 million coins produced. Collectors look for above-average quality samples, which may be for up to $0.67.

San Francisco Mint (“S” Mintmark): The final year of coining operations in San Francisco. These coins were swiftly pulled from circulation due to their anticipated scarcity as collectibles. The value varies greatly:
1955 DLB DIE: A rare variant worth between $1,317 and $2,313.
1955 D: It is worth between $0.02 to $0.67.
1955 S: Valued from $0.03 to $0.77.

Condition

The better the condition, the higher the value. Lightly worn 1955 pennies are more desirable to collectors.

Special Qualities

Certain components add or subtract from value. Eye appeal is important, therefore uneven coloration (bright and dark parts) might influence the coin’s value. There’s also an uncommon variation known as the 1955 Doubled Die (DDO) penny. Its worth is dependent on condition and color:

Mint StatePrice
MS 62$2,450 to $2,940
MS 63$2,800 to $3,360
MS 64$3,600 to $4,320
MS 65$7,500 to $8,500

1955 penny value error

Mint Mark Varieties

The 1955 Wheat penny was minted in three locations: Philadelphia Mint, Denver Mint, and San Francisco Mint. Philadelphia Mint mints abundant, worth around $0.02 in good condition.

Denver Mint mints over 563 million coins, with collectors seeking quality examples worth up to $0.67. San Francisco Mint mints mint the last year of coining operations. Rare varieties are valued between $1,317 and $2,313.

Special Qualities and Errors

The 1955 Wheat penny features a portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the obverse, marking the first real person to appear on US currency. The reverse design features two ears of durum wheat curving along the coin edges. A rare variety, the 1955 Doubled Die (DDO) penny, has a value varying based on condition and color.

Estimated to be 10,000 to 15,000, these error pennies are highly valuable and collectible, ranging from $2,450 to over $100,000, depending on their appearance and toning beauty.

Legacy and Design

The 1955 Wheat penny, part of the Lincoln penny series, features a portrait of Lincoln by Victor David Brenner. Initially, the reverse design did not bear Brenner’s signature due to perceived prominence. In 1959, the reverse design featured the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

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